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The Mid Term Review (MTR) report of the DFID-funded, What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls programme, is now available to read online. Its evaluation objectives are, to: 1) Evaluate the programme’s performance against the overall programme outputs and outcomes at the mid-term and end of the programme, 2) Assess the quality of the research outputs, as this can impinge significantly on uptake; and…
The theme for International Women’s Day 2017 was Be Bold for Change. An important part of that change is having more women of colour in leadership positions around the world. However, while being individually ‘bold’ is important, it is never going to be enough. We cannot achieve gender, racial and economic equality through some self-empowerment, lean-in, work-hard-and-all-your-dreams-will-come-true, model of change…
What Works in celebration of International Women’s Day #BeBoldForChange For 109 years, International Women’s Day (IWD) has been uniting global communities to celebrate women and ensure their safety and equality. As the world pauses to commemorate International Women’s Day (IWD) today, March 8th 2017, we seize the opportunity to reflect on the work being done to support the health and…
International leaders met in Davos, Switzerland, at the annual World Economic Forum to discuss global issues, with a focus on this year’s theme of "Responsive and Responsible Leadership."  The International Rescue Committee (IRC) works with people affected by conflict and disaster across the world. They understand the value of strong leadership and equality. By empowering local people, particularly women and girls, lives…
Stanford researchers have found that trainings designed for young girls focusing on empowerment and for young boys focusing on gender norms have decreased sexual violence in Nairobi settlements.  The Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research held its quarterly symposium, focusing on these findings discovered through the work of Clea Sarnquist, senior research scholar and lecturer of infectious disease in pediatrics…
International Alert is implementing a new approach to tackling violence against women and girls in rural Tajikistan, which takes into account traditional cultural practices in the country. Abuse against women and girls is a widespread problem in Tajikistan, driven by gender equalities and job insecurities. As with other parts of Asia, the family unit here extends to a bigger group…
Despite a legal and policy framework supportive of gender equality and condemning violence against women, intimate partner violence (IPV) remains widespread in Rwanda. Indashyikirwa - an innovative community-level gender based violence (GBV) prevention programme funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and led by CARE in partnership with the Rwanda Women Network (RWN), Rwanda’s Men Resource Center (RWAMREC)…
Ma’an Network Hosts a Training Workshop on Preventing Violence against Women November 10, 2016 Jericho – Ma’an News Agency – Ma’an Network concluded a two-day training workshop on Thursday, held at the Jericho Resort Village, as part of a larger project aiming to prevent violence against women and girls in the Palestinian community. Participants included Ma’an News Agency media representatives,…
Law enforcement agencies who handle issues of gender violence have been urged to be more humane in the discharge of their duties, and be more sensitive to the plight of victims. Download the article here.
Since 2012 Project Empower have been running an intervention called Stepping Stones and Creating Futures in informal settlements in eThekwini, South Africa. Now, supported by the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Global Programme funded with UKAID, they have a chance to evaluate this promising intervention. South Africa is probably the most unequal society in the world,…
Tuesday, 29 November 2016 13:37

Home isn’t the only place women are abused

Violence against women is bad for everyone. It disempowers female workers, lowers productivity, drives out talent, and badly damages the reputation of global brands.  It’s also bad for the global economy: Research suggests that as much as 2% of global GDP is used in responding to violence against women.  What’s more, tackling workplace violence can have a spillover effect.  Empowering…
The effectiveness of economic empowerment programmes, poverty reduction programmes and others working to address inequality depend on the efforts to combat VAW, which is at the core of the economic and social challenges of our times, writes Dr. Nata Duvvury.  Dr. Duvvury has published an article in the Guardian Newspaper and is currently the Lead of Component Three on the What Works…
Wednesday, 05 October 2016 11:30

What Works at Safe Summit Ireland

Dr. Nata Duvvury, Component Three PI, will be speaking at the Safe Ireland Summit, on the 14th and 15th November, in The Round Room at the Mansion House, Dublin. Safe Ireland is gathering world thinkers, creators and doers who have much to contribute to the vision of a safe country. The summit includes more than 20 fascinating speakers, installations of…
Dr Nata Duvvury, Senior Lecturer and Director of the Centre for Global Women’s Studies at the National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway and PI of the What Works: Economic and Social Costs of Violence project, was an expert advisor at the High Level Discussion on Economic Costs of Violence against Women (VAW) at the 71st Session of the United Nations…
Monday, 03 October 2016 16:31

How do you “do” ethnography in studies?

As part of the Stepping Stones and Creating Futures impact evaluation funded by What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls? Programme and UKAID, the team undertakes much qualitative research to understand our young women’s and men’s lives and how the intervention helps them negotiate life’s changes. In addition to the many in-depth interviews, we have carried out over…
As an ethnographer on the Stepping Stones and Creating Futures intervention trial currently underway in Durban, South Africa, I have been absolutely amazed hearing the stories of the facilitators. Their incredible resilience in overcoming challenges when they head out to run the intervention in informal settlements around the city and has led me to call them: the fanatics. The Stepping…
Everything is extremely lush in Nepal and a steady curtain of monsoon rain falls. I’m just back after three days visiting project activities in Nawalparasi, one of the three intervention districts – a 20 min flight or up to 12 hours drive during the monsoon from Kathmandu. The Equal Access ‘Change Starts at Home’ project targets young married couples and…
Wednesday, 29 June 2016 14:01

Life in Dadaab

Component 2 is conducting research in Dadaab refugee camp, assessing a comprehensive case management model where tasks are shared between national staff and refugee community workers to provide services for women who have experienced violence. Here a young researcher provides us with a glimpse into what it’s really like to live and work in Dadaab refugee camp and on the…
Recently, one woman’s horror and heroism has brought a much needed change in the conversation about rape in our society. Brock Turner’s rape of a woman at Stanford University, and his unacceptable 6-month sentence, reveals not just a horrendous, all too common sexual assault, but a broken system that continues to protect male abusers, blame victims and condone violence against…
I was half way across the world from my family in the Philippines when Typhoon Haiyan wreaked havoc two years ago. As a Filipina citizen it was hard to see the footage; to hear my family talk about the devastation and the people they couldn’t get in touch with. In some ways it was even harder knowing what was going…
The magnitude of GBV incidence in Papua New Guinea is considered by some to be of epidemic proportions. The social, emotional and physical costs of GBV are widely recognised, as are national-level economic costs. But the impact at individual firm level is less well understood. This toolkit seeks to provide NGOs, academia or businesses with the means to assess the…
We know that allocation of resources is political. To make decisions, we need to show the cost of doing nothing. - Nata Duvvury, Economist and lead technical advisor to the costing of violence against women studies. Access the full article...
New £1.5 million project to focus on economic and social costs of violence against women and girls A new research project announced today (11 February) is to investigate the social and economic costs of violence against women and girls in developing countries. Led by Dr Nata Duvvury of the National University of Ireland Galway, and funded by the UK’s Department…
At last it seems the world is recognising that economies built on a foundation of patriarchy are inefficient as well as unequal and unjust. As the 60th Commission on the Status of Women opens in New York this week, a series of promising global initiatives are underway to address women’s systematic exclusion from economic advancement. This calls for celebration –…
A new half hour radio drama and discussion programme will soon be launched by Equal Access International in Nepal and is the key component of the multi-faceted 'Change Starts at Home' project, part of the DFID What Works portfolio, supported through the South African Medical Research Council. The programme is aptly named 'Samajhdari' meaning 'mutual understanding' in Nepali and is targeted at…
To reduce violence against women we must understand the multidimensional nature of female oppression, writes Nolwazi Ntini, Ethnographer/Project Manager, Gender Equality and Health Programme, HEARD, UKZN. https://whatworksglobal.wordpress.com/2016/05/18/on-strengthening-the-feminist-movement-in-southern-africa/  
Andrew Gibbs, a researcher at the Gender Equality and Health Programme at HEARD at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, and the PI on the Stepping Stones and Creating Futures evaluation funded by What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women, is presenting at the International Conference on Community Psychology (ICCP) in Durban running from 27th to 30th May. He will present a…
Andrew Gibbs from the gender equality and health unit at HEARD and Nwabisa Jama Shai from the gender and health unit of the South African Medical Research Council on strengthening government, civil society and academic relationships for evidenced-based policy and programming to prevent VAWG.  
Monday, 14 March 2016 13:13

The Commission on the Status of Women

Putting Violence Against Women at the Centre of the Agenda for Women’s Economic Empowerment Agenda At last it seems the world is recognising that economies built on a foundation of patriarchy are inefficient as well as unequal and unjust. As the 60th Commission on the Status of Women opens in New York this week, a series of promising global initiatives…
Friday, 11 March 2016 12:19

BLOG: Business for Social Responsiblity

Business for Social Responsiblity (BSR) is a recipient of the What Works To Prevent Violence Programme grant in Bangladesh and is currently implementing the HERrespect project which focuses on promoting positive gender relations through workplace interventions.  In celebration of the International Women's Day held on the 8th of March 2016, BSR has published two articles highlighting their work on the i)…
On Tuesday 26 January 2016, The Gender & Development Network and What Works To Prevent Violence Against Women & Girls Programme are presenting the first set of emerging findings on preventing violence against women and girls at The London School of Hygeine & Tropical Medicine. Speakers include Professor Rachel Jewkes from SA MRC, who will provide an overview of the…
As this year’s 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence campaign draws to a close, it’s a good time for us to pause and reflect on the progress we have made toward ending violence against women and girls (VAWG) in the 20 years since the Beijing Conference, a significant turning point for the global agenda for gender equality. Jennifer McCleary-Sills…
In a recent article in The Guardian newspaper, Gemma Ferguson from our Change Starts at Home Programme provides tips on how to get the best out of collaboration. During a recent presentation, I was given a raucous round of applause from the academics in the room for correctly describing our project’s study as a “pair-matched, repeated cross-sectional, two-armed, single-blinded, cluster…
Professor Rachel Jewkes writes: Living in South Africa I have become painfully aware of how VAWG deeply impacts on every family, most heinously in the murder of women by their partners. So it feels right, that on the eve on the 16 Days of Activism, we are announcing a series of new evaluations in South Africa that, with support from…
A year ago, The Lancet published a Series on violence against women and girls ahead of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on Nov 25. The day marks the start of the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, which this year, for the first time, has prevention as its theme. This focus is encouraging. One…
In this article we’d like to showcase DFID’s What Works to Prevent Violence: A Global Programme in which SDDirect is a core partner.  We are part of a consortium led by working with the South African Medical Research Council and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine that is supporting 10 innovation grants and seven research projects across Africa,…
I am writing this blog from a stunning villa in Umbria, looking out on the ancient city of Todi, which at this moment emerges from an ocean of mist like an island. My three young children are at home in Australia with my husband, their father. Sadly, having just relocated our family across the world, we felt incapable of enduring…
The phrase "spare the rod and spoil the child," commonly claimed to have come from the King James version of the Bible, implies that if one does not discipline a child, he or she will never learn obedience or good manners. This proverb is still today often used as a justification to violate children, a rationale for being violent without…
The Ministry of Education and Professional Training will recommend the incorporation of play and sporting in the National Education Policy 2015 and advocate that all four provinces devise a policy to place sport and play on their education agendas. A pledge to this effect was made by Minister of State for Education and Professional Training Baligh-Ur-Rehman while speaking as chief…
Little is known about the factors that drive the geographical distribution of partner violence or how macro-level factors might combine with individual-level factors to affect individual women's risk of intimate partner violence. We aimed to assess the role that women's status and other gender-related factors might have in defining levels of partner violence among settings.We compiled data for the 12…
Technical leads from the Global Programme consortium partners met with researchers and managers from the What Works grantees, to set into motion the process of learning and working together. The Induction Meeting, held in Istanbul in January provided grantees with an introduction to best practices toward designing and implementing prevention research and projects, from globally recognised leaders in the field.
NAIROBI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The schoolboy watched as a man tried to remove the nappy of a little girl he was dragging along a Nairobi riverbank, suspecting that he was going to rape her. Having been trained to defend girls against sexual assault, the boy called other young men to help him confront the man and rescue the child.…
What Works has been shaping understanding of the underlying factors that lead to violence against women and girls, and pushing a global movement of support for prevention activities, via meetings with the United Nations and the World Bank. Representatives from all three components of the What Works programme, including Dr Emma Fulu from the South African Medical Research Council, and…
Governments that cut back on supports such as rape crisis counselling during times of economic crisis are “shooting themselves in the foot”, a global expert on women’s studies has said. Violence against women and girls has a social and economic impact, according to NUI Galway global women’s studies centre director Dr Nata Duvvury, who is leading a new international research…
A comedy series and a ‘Judge Judy’-style show will be among the programmes aired across the Palestinian territories in 2015, as part of a multimedia project to raise awareness of, and seek to prevent, violence against women and girls. The Ma’an Network, an independent, non-profit media organisation that broadcasts across the West Bank and Gaza, will use a £730,000 grant…
Baroness Lindsay Northover, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for International Development writes: I was delighted to launch DFID’s flagship global programme of £25 million for ground-breaking research to identify what really works in preventing violence. Speaking at the South African Medical Research Council, who will undertake the research, it was clear that this information will fill vital gaps in the…
In recent years, attention has turned to engaging men and boys rather than talking to women about how to avoid violence. Now The UN’s high-profile He For She campaign is just one example of the projects emerging that call on all men – not just those who are violent – to be part of the solution. They are asked to…
In Afghanistan, physical and emotional abuse of Afghan women and girls has existed for centuries and is ingrained in the country’s culture of impunity. However, it wasn’t until the oppressive Taliban regime, when the world became aware of the plight of women and girls in the country. In 2002, after the overthrow of the Taliban and establishment of the new…
Britain will fund 18 ground breaking research programmes to help prevent violence against women and girls as part of the Department for International Development’s What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Programme. The projects, selected in conjunction with the Medical Research Council South Africa, will implement and test cutting-edge interventions that aim to fundamentally advance approaches to stopping…
What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls, a global research and innovation programme to help prevent violence against women and girls was launched in South Africa today by UK International Development Minister, Baroness Northover. The What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls programme will build knowledge on which interventions work to strengthen women and girls ability…
The then Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for International Development, the Rt. Hon. Lynne Featherstone, launched What Works to a packed room at the Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict on June 11. Speakers had to be set up outside the main auditorium, to accommodate the level of interest from policymakers who were willing to stand in order…
Today is the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women. Eliminate. Stop. End. Fight against. What is the problem with this language and our current approach to ending violence against women? The issue is that this is a deficit, problem-focused model of action. It focuses on the negative and is reactionary. I believe that to create a world…
“Over the past 10-15 years, interventions focused on male engagement to end violence against women have proliferated around the world. Many donors these days are interested in programmes that are working with boys and men. But does it work? Is it the magic bullet to this global problem? Or is it a step backwards?” Access the full article.
Five papers cover the evidence base for interventions, discuss the vital role of the health sector in care and prevention, show the need for men and women to be involved in effective programmes, provide practical lessons from experience in countries, and present a call for action with five key recommendations and indicators to track progress. Access articles here.
The Huffington Post – It IS #TimeToAct But What Do We Do? “The key here is prevention, that is, addressing the underlying root causes to stop violence happening in the first place. This includes addressing dominant ideas of what it means to be a man, stopping the cycle of violence where experiences of child abuse lead to violence in adult…
“Currently, there are a lot of gaps in the evidence and data on what the common drivers of behaviour are leading to violence not least because of the sensitive nature of the research and data collection. We need to gather robust evidence that helps us develop effective interventions which deliver large scale results.” Access the full article.
“As highlighted by Rachel Jewkes in a compelling Art of Medicine piece, researching warzone violence is extremely challenging. And the difficulties of preventing and responding to it are compounded by little evidence on the effectiveness of interventions. Therefore, it is encouraging that the UK's Department of International Development will launch a multimillion pound “What works” research programme at the summit…

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