ResourcesWhat Works Resources

 

The manual is intended to be used in its entirety with peer group participants who work through all sessions, each building on previous sessions. It is designed for use with people of any age and both genders. Originally developed for use in small, rural communities in Uganda, it has now been adapted for South Africa and after well over a decade of use is in its 3rd Edition. The Stepping Stones workshops are designed to be held with two or more peer groups drawn from a community at the same time (although this is not essential).

download1

 

Creating Futures is a programme designed to enhance the ability of young people to think more critically in appraising opportunities and challenges related to their lives and livelihoods. It was developed for implementation among young people (18-24 years) living in urban informal settlements in South Africa. Creating Futures is designed to be facilitated by trained peer facilitators in a participatory style, encouraging participants to seek and develop relevant livelihoods for themselves through their own learning.

download1

 

 

The Right To Play Project Newsletter for April to September 2016 is out! Download it here.

download1

 

Violence persists in sex workers’ relationships with their intimate partners, an intervention and evaluation study, Samvedana Plus, was designed to understand and address violence and HIV risk in the intimate partnerships of female sex workers. Karnataka Health Promotion Trust (KHPT) is implementing Samvedana Plus, in partnership with Chaitanya AIDS Tadegattuwa Mahila Sangha, a communitybased organisation (CBO) of sex workers in northern Karnataka, India. The findings of the report are related to four broad categories: characteristics of the female sex workers and intimate partner relationships; gender attitudes, social norms and violence acceptance; experience of intimate partner violence, solidarity and self-worth; and STI/HIV risk perceptions, skills for self-protection and condom use among female sex workers.

download1 

The Right to Play Project will conduct an extensive impact evaluation, that will contribute new evidence on best practice approaches to working through schools and sports programmes, to build positive attitudes and support for gender equality amongst young people.  This programme is funded by the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls. The latest project updates are included in the November 2015 newsletter.

pdf Download (1.30 MB)

Orange Day 2015 Celebrations - Infographic Report

Globally, one in three women have experienced physical or sexual violence in their lifetime, mostly from an intimate partner. From 25 November through 10 December, Human Rights Day, KHPT’s programmes on 16 days of activism against gender based violence focused on the 2015 theme, ‘Preventing Violence against Women’, of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.

Under the Samvedana Plus programme, village walks, street plays, and community discussions were organised to raise awareness and mobilise village communities to end violence against women. These events highlighted the discrimination faced by women and girls within these communities and galvanised local action calling for an end to violence against them.

pdf Download (740 KB)

The Karnataka Health Promotion Trust, University of Manitoba and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine are evaluating the impact of Samvedana Plus within a DFID-funded consortium called STRIVE.  The findings from this study will form the qualitative baseline for STRIVE's evaluation of the Samvedana Plus intervention, which is supported by the DFID-funded consortium What Works to prevent Violence Against Women.

pdf Download (2.74 MB)

To reduce risk of HIV and STIs, programmes should promote equitable gender norms. This means working with men to redefine masculinity in other ways, not as dominance and control. To do this, it is important to collect evidence of gender norms and IPV as possible drivers of HIV transmission, and to share new understanding with government, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and community-based organisations (CBOs), funders and communities.

pdf Download (608 KB)

What is Samvedana Plus? An intervention and evaluation study, Samvedana Plus aims to understand and address violence and HIV risk in the intimate partnerships of female sex workers. This brochure provides background information about the Samvedana Plus study.

pdf Download (577 KB)

The high prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) amongst women, and particularly those in sex work or female sex workers (FSWs), has been increasingly recognized. Studies involving female sex workers have focussed on violence from clients, often quantitatively identifying risk factors.  Few studies have examined IPV facing FSWs and none have included both male and female partners or taken a community-based research (CBR) approach. Qualitative community-based research is valuable for better understanding the mechanisms by which multi-levelled factors may be increasing vulnerability to IPV, from the perspective of women in sex work and their male intimate partners.

pdf Download (884 KB)

The Samvedana Poster illustrates the findings from the participatory research in North Karnataka, India. The objective of the study is to understand the drivers of violence and condom use in the relationship between sex workers and their intimate partners. This study was conducted in two separate, three-day residential workshops with 31 female sex workers (FSWs) and 37 intimate partners (IPs).

pdf Download (2.99 MB)

The role of the male partners in determining the sex workers’ sexual behaviour is very significant. The male partners’ ideas of masculinity, sanctions given by society and the lack of accountability and responsibility in a sexual relationship increases the risk and vulnerability of their female partners,female sex workers as well as the general population of women, particularly regular female partners. Karnataka Health Promotion Trust has conducted a series of participatory workshops with sex workers and their intimate partners to explore how they understand and interpret their relationships, the reasons for not using condoms in these relationships and the role of violence and its consequences.

pdf Download (3.07 MB)

A lack of understanding of the nature and dynamics of sex workers’ relationship with their intimate partnerships made it difficult to design appropriate strategies to address the issues of non-usage of condoms and violence which increase FSWs’ risk and vulnerability. Karnataka Health Promotion Trust (KHPT) tried to address this gap by conducting a series of participatory workshops with sex workers and their intimate partners to explore how they understand and interpret their relationships, reasons for not using condoms in intimate relationships, the role of violence and its consequences.

pdf Download (3.25 MB)