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An article by Greg Nicolson in South Africa’s Daily Maverick, which includes an interview with Dr Andrew Gibbs from the Medical Research Council, who also works with the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Global Programme, notes that there are practical interventions that could help address the long-standing crisis women in South Africa regularly face with regards danger…
The Mid Term Review (MTR) report of the DFID-funded, What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls programme, is now available to read online. Its evaluation objectives are, to: 1) Evaluate the programme’s performance against the overall programme outputs and outcomes at the mid-term and end of the programme, 2) Assess the quality of the research outputs, as this can impinge significantly on uptake; and…
The theme for International Women’s Day 2017 was Be Bold for Change. An important part of that change is having more women of colour in leadership positions around the world. However, while being individually ‘bold’ is important, it is never going to be enough. We cannot achieve gender, racial and economic equality through some self-empowerment, lean-in, work-hard-and-all-your-dreams-will-come-true, model of change…
What Works in celebration of International Women’s Day #BeBoldForChange For 109 years, International Women’s Day (IWD) has been uniting global communities to celebrate women and ensure their safety and equality. As the world pauses to commemorate International Women’s Day (IWD) today, March 8th 2017, we seize the opportunity to reflect on the work being done to support the health and…
Stanford researchers have found that trainings designed for young girls focusing on empowerment and for young boys focusing on gender norms have decreased sexual violence in Nairobi settlements.  The Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research held its quarterly symposium, focusing on these findings discovered through the work of Clea Sarnquist, senior research scholar and lecturer of infectious disease in pediatrics…
International Alert is implementing a new approach to tackling violence against women and girls in rural Tajikistan, which takes into account traditional cultural practices in the country. Abuse against women and girls is a widespread problem in Tajikistan, driven by gender equalities and job insecurities. As with other parts of Asia, the family unit here extends to a bigger group…
Despite a legal and policy framework supportive of gender equality and condemning violence against women, intimate partner violence (IPV) remains widespread in Rwanda. Indashyikirwa - an innovative community-level gender based violence (GBV) prevention programme funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and led by CARE in partnership with the Rwanda Women Network (RWN), Rwanda’s Men Resource Center (RWAMREC)…
Law enforcement agencies who handle issues of gender violence have been urged to be more humane in the discharge of their duties, and be more sensitive to the plight of victims. Download the article here.
Since 2012 Project Empower have been running an intervention called Stepping Stones and Creating Futures in informal settlements in eThekwini, South Africa. Now, supported by the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Global Programme funded with UKAID, they have a chance to evaluate this promising intervention. South Africa is probably the most unequal society in the world,…
Violence against women is bad for everyone. It disempowers female workers, lowers productivity, drives out talent, and badly damages the reputation of global brands.  It’s also bad for the global economy: Research suggests that as much as 2% of global GDP is used in responding to violence against women.  What’s more, tackling workplace violence can have a spillover effect.  Empowering…
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