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Equal Access’ Change Starts at Home featured in The Himalayan Times Change Starts at Home, a project run by Equal Access which uses media and community mobilization to prevent IPV against women and girls in Chitwan, Nawalparasi and Kapilvastu, Nepal, was featured in The Himalayan Times, Nepal’s No. 1 English daily newspaper this month. The article has highlighted the study…
The HERrespect Project which aims to promote positive gender relations through Workplace Interventions in Bangladesh has been cited in the March 2017 Edition of the Infrastructure and Cities Briefing Paper (ICEF). The ready-made garment (RMG) industry in Bangladesh employs up to four million people and has high female participation. Building on BSR’s ten years of experience creating workplace-based women’s empowerment programs, HERrespect is developing…
The Change Starts at Home project was featured in the Emory Grow! Newsletter during the month of June.  The Change Starts at Home Project has completed a series of 3 mini videos with the What Works PI Dr Cari Clark highlighting on the projects approach and strategies. The videos are accessible by clicking on the links in the newsletter.  
An article by Greg Nicolson in South Africa’s Daily Maverick, which includes an interview with Dr Andrew Gibbs from the Medical Research Council, who also works with the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Global Programme, notes that there are practical interventions that could help address the long-standing crisis women in South Africa regularly face with regards danger…
The Mid Term Review (MTR) report of the DFID-funded, What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls programme, is now available to read online. Its evaluation objectives are, to: 1) Evaluate the programme’s performance against the overall programme outputs and outcomes at the mid-term and end of the programme, 2) Assess the quality of the research outputs, as this can impinge significantly on uptake; and…
The theme for International Women’s Day 2017 was Be Bold for Change. An important part of that change is having more women of colour in leadership positions around the world. However, while being individually ‘bold’ is important, it is never going to be enough. We cannot achieve gender, racial and economic equality through some self-empowerment, lean-in, work-hard-and-all-your-dreams-will-come-true, model of change…
What Works in celebration of International Women’s Day #BeBoldForChange For 109 years, International Women’s Day (IWD) has been uniting global communities to celebrate women and ensure their safety and equality. As the world pauses to commemorate International Women’s Day (IWD) today, March 8th 2017, we seize the opportunity to reflect on the work being done to support the health and…
International leaders met in Davos, Switzerland, at the annual World Economic Forum to discuss global issues, with a focus on this year’s theme of "Responsive and Responsible Leadership."  The International Rescue Committee (IRC) works with people affected by conflict and disaster across the world. They understand the value of strong leadership and equality. By empowering local people, particularly women and girls, lives…
Stanford researchers have found that trainings designed for young girls focusing on empowerment and for young boys focusing on gender norms have decreased sexual violence in Nairobi settlements.  The Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research held its quarterly symposium, focusing on these findings discovered through the work of Clea Sarnquist, senior research scholar and lecturer of infectious disease in pediatrics…
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