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Stanford researchers have found that trainings designed for young girls focusing on empowerment and for young boys focusing on gender norms have decreased sexual violence in Nairobi settlements.  The Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research held its quarterly symposium, focusing on these findings discovered through the work of Clea Sarnquist, senior research scholar and lecturer of infectious disease in pediatrics…
International Alert is implementing a new approach to tackling violence against women and girls in rural Tajikistan, which takes into account traditional cultural practices in the country. Abuse against women and girls is a widespread problem in Tajikistan, driven by gender equalities and job insecurities. As with other parts of Asia, the family unit here extends to a bigger group…
Despite a legal and policy framework supportive of gender equality and condemning violence against women, intimate partner violence (IPV) remains widespread in Rwanda. Indashyikirwa - an innovative community-level gender based violence (GBV) prevention programme funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and led by CARE in partnership with the Rwanda Women Network (RWN), Rwanda’s Men Resource Center (RWAMREC)…
Law enforcement agencies who handle issues of gender violence have been urged to be more humane in the discharge of their duties, and be more sensitive to the plight of victims. Download the article here.
Since 2012 Project Empower have been running an intervention called Stepping Stones and Creating Futures in informal settlements in eThekwini, South Africa. Now, supported by the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Global Programme funded with UKAID, they have a chance to evaluate this promising intervention. South Africa is probably the most unequal society in the world,…
Violence against women is bad for everyone. It disempowers female workers, lowers productivity, drives out talent, and badly damages the reputation of global brands.  It’s also bad for the global economy: Research suggests that as much as 2% of global GDP is used in responding to violence against women.  What’s more, tackling workplace violence can have a spillover effect.  Empowering…
The effectiveness of economic empowerment programmes, poverty reduction programmes and others working to address inequality depend on the efforts to combat VAW, which is at the core of the economic and social challenges of our times, writes Dr. Nata Duvvury.  Dr. Duvvury has published an article in the Guardian Newspaper and is currently the Lead of Component Three on the What Works…
Dr. Nata Duvvury, Component Three PI, will be speaking at the Safe Ireland Summit, on the 14th and 15th November, in The Round Room at the Mansion House, Dublin. Safe Ireland is gathering world thinkers, creators and doers who have much to contribute to the vision of a safe country. The summit includes more than 20 fascinating speakers, installations of…
Dr Nata Duvvury, Senior Lecturer and Director of the Centre for Global Women’s Studies at the National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway and PI of the What Works: Economic and Social Costs of Violence project, was an expert advisor at the High Level Discussion on Economic Costs of Violence against Women (VAW) at the 71st Session of the United Nations…
As part of the Stepping Stones and Creating Futures impact evaluation funded by What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls? Programme and UKAID, the team undertakes much qualitative research to understand our young women’s and men’s lives and how the intervention helps them negotiate life’s changes. In addition to the many in-depth interviews, we have carried out over…
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