Evidence HubWhat Works Resources

 

Displaying items by tag: VAWG & Social norms

This data includes questions used to measure gender equity and core gender attitudes, and contains statistical information illustrating attitudes towards gender in Pakistan and Afghanistan. The report also contains an assessment of the differing attitudes towards gender between the Pashtun and Tajik communities in Afghanistan.

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There has been a growing interest in deriving the associated costs of violence against women. This has coincided with an explosion of costing studies in recent years, particularly after 2000, when interest in establishing these costs grew dramatically. Currently over 55 studies, mostly from high-income countries, have attempted to quantify the costs of various forms of violence against women. However, providing a comparison across countries can be difficult. This is mainly due to the different categories of costs, different forms of violence, and the different sampling approaches undertaken by individual studies (Varcoe et al., 2011). This comparison becomes even more difficult in developing country contexts where the availability of data is less robust and less systematic attention has been placed on measuring the economic costs of violence against women when compared to their industrialised counterparts. In this review of the evidence on the costs of violence against women, we provide an assessment of what we have learned and we establish the gaps which need to be addressed in future costing studies. 

Authors: Ashe, S., Duvvury, N., Raghavendra, S., Scriver, S., and O’Donovan, D.

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What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls is a £25 million global programme funded by the UK Department for International Development which seeks to understand and address the underlying causes of violence across Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The What Works programme is not alone in investing time and resources in researching and prioritising prevention and response to GBV. In 2013, Sweden and the UK Department for International Development jointly launched the Call to Action on Protection from GBV in Emergencies, a global appeal to diverse stakeholders – governments, donors, NGOs, civil society, women’s organisations, the private sector-to make specific commitments to contribute towards transforming the way GBV is addressed in the humanitarian space.

This brief sets out how the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls in Conflict and Humanitarian Crises research portfolio complements and supports the achievements of the Call to Action’s objectives. The Call to Action identifies am “insufficient evidence base on effective programming and systemic response” as one of its areas of concern. As the largest multi-year study currently examining VAWG in conflict and crisis, What Works will play in instrumental role in advancing research in this area.

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A study of levels of IPV against FSW in this area of Southern India produced a significant anomaly. IPs reported significantly higher incidences of violence than FSW. This presentation looks at three potential hypotheses for the anomaly, namely: IPs over-reported the violence; respondents didn’t understand the question; and FSW under-reported the violence.

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This presentation looks at masculinity and VAWG in South Africa. However, as the slides involved are essentially there to illustrate the points being made by the speaker. Without the accompanying dialogue/narrative, it’s difficult to draw significant conclusions.

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This presentation unveils a trial used to test the effectiveness of a multi-pronged intervention in reducing and preventing violence against women and girls/youth (VAWG) among families living in Lusaka, Zambia, and to test the effectiveness of the intervention in reducing identified risk factors of violence including, alcohol use, mental health problems and behaviour patterns.

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This presentation unveils a trial used to test the effectiveness of a multi-pronged intervention in reducing and preventing violence against women and girls/youth (VAWG) among families living in Lusaka, Zambia, and to test the effectiveness of the intervention in reducing identified risk factors of violence including, alcohol use, mental health problems and behaviour patterns.

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32% of Nepal reproductive age women report lifetime emotional, physical, or sexual IPV. Yet what is missing in Nepal and elsewhere is understanding of the patterns of violent experiences. This study seeks to correct this by studying different types of IPV in Nepal, and in particular assessing the prevalence of each type of IPV by district and other covariates.

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This presentation shares the preliminary findings from the formative research conducted among communities engaged in migrant labour in Baglung district of Nepal. The study explored: the nature of VAWG and its effects; the community response to VAWG; and the linkages between economic conditions and VAWG.

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