Evidence HubWhat Works Resources

 

This presentation given by the Stanford Gender-Based Violence Prevention Collaborative presents a matched-set, cluster-randomised trial of upper-primary students in the unplanned settlements around Nairobi, Kenya. The intervention features parallel boys and girls curriculums delivered in a classroom environment. There are six sessions, two hours per session, featuring group-based, roleplaying and situational practice. The girls’ program is a four-pronged approach: empowerment, situational awareness, verbal skills, physical self-defense skills. Boys’ program focuses on positive masculinity and, for older adolescents, includes bystander-intervention training.

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Violence against women, recognised globally as a fundamental human rights violation, is widely prevalent across high-, middle-, and lowincome countries. It imposes direct and indirect costs and losses on the well-being of individuals, families and communities, businesses, national economies, social and economic development and political stability. Recently, there has been a growing interest in deriving the associated costs of violence against women. This has coincided with an explosion of costing studies in recent years, particularly after 2000. In this review of the evidence, we provide an assessment of what we have learned and we establish the gaps which still need to be addressed in future costing studies.

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This project contends that the failure to eliminate VAWG constitutes a drag on national economies and on inclusive human development. There is thus strong incentive for investment by government and other stakeholders to address VAWG – the cost of inaction is signifi cant. This project aims to build knowledge about the impacts of VAWG and thus to mobilise political will to eliminate violence worldwide. Through the development of new costing methodologies that can be applied within different national contexts, this project will provide policy makers with the tools to estimate the impact of VAWG. To develop such tools, it is necessary to collect data and evaluate methodologies within a range of political, economic, cultural and social contexts. This study is therefore being conducted in three countries in the Global South that exhibit marked differences in terms of context: South Sudan, Pakistan and Ghana.

In Pakistan, the project aims to fi ll the gaps in our understanding of the socio-economic impacts of VAWG, focusing on intimate partner violence (IPV) and non-partner sexual violence (NPSV). The project will go beyond costs to individuals by providing estimates of the loss to the overall economy of Pakistan. In addition, we examine costs arising from the impact of VAWG on social cohesion and political stability.

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This project contends that the failure to eliminate VAWG constitutes a drag on national economies and on inclusive human development. There is thus strong incentive for investment by government and other stakeholders to address VAWG – the cost of inaction is signifi cant. This project aims to build knowledge about the impacts of VAWG and thus to mobilise political will to eliminate violence worldwide. Through the development of new costing methodologies that can be applied within different national contexts, this project will provide policy makers with the tools to estimate the impact of VAWG. To develop such tools, it is necessary to collect data and evaluate methodologies within a range of political, economic, cultural and social contexts. This study is therefore being conducted in three countries in the Global South that exhibit marked differences in terms of context: South Sudan, Pakistan and Ghana.

In Ghana, the project aims to fi ll the gaps in our understanding of the socio-economic impacts of VAWG, focusing on intimate partner violence (IPV) and non-partner sexual violence (NPSV). The project will go beyond costs to individuals by providing estimates of the loss to the overall economy of Ghana. In addition, we examine costs arising from the impact of VAWG on social cohesion and political stability.

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This presentation addresses the forms of intimate partner violence and associated HIV risk and vulnerability among women in sex work in Karnataka, India. The project, in the Bagalkot district of Karnataka, Southern India, examines the link between IPV and low condom use in the relationships of female sex workers. It concludes that any effective HIV prevention strategy must address the issue of IPV.

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“All in the name of love”: Understanding the relationship between female sex workers and their intimate partners. This presentation covers the exploratory research carried out in North Karnataka, India to understand the relationship between sex workers and their intimate partners and the drivers of violence and condom use in these intimate relationships. The qualitative study was conducted in two separate, three-day residential workshops with 31 female sex workers (FSWs) and 37 intimate partners (IPs), and addresses the nature of these relationships.

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