Evidence HubWhat Works Resources

 

Gibbs, A., Dunkle, K., Willan, S., Jama-Shai, N., Washington, L., & Jewkes, R. (2018). Are women’s experiences of emotional and economic intimate partner violence associated with HIV-risk behaviour? A cross-sectional analysis of young women in informal settlements in South Africa. AIDS Care, 1-8.

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Violence against women and girls is widespread in South Africa. Women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) and non-partner sexual violence have poorer health outcomes, including higher levels of depression and alcohol use, and are more likely to acquire HIV.

In the eThekwini Municipality of South Africa, approximately 40% of the population live in informal settlements. With a combination of poverty and unemployment, widespread violence, racism and xenophobia, urban informal settlements have very high levels of violence against women, mental trauma, alcohol and drug abuse, and HIV

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10 October 2018

Stepping Stones

Stepping Stones is a workshop series designed as a tool to help promote sexual health, improve psychological well-being and prevent HIV. The workshops address questions of gender, sexuality, HIV/AIDS, gender violence, communication and relationship skills. In doing so they recognise that our sexual lives are embedded in a broader context of our relationships with our  partners, families and the community or society in which we live.

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Creating Futures is a programme designed to enhance the ability of young people to think more critically in appraising opportunities and challenges related to their lives and livelihoods. It was developed for implementation among young people (18-24 years) living in urban informal settlements in South Africa. Creating Futures is designed to be facilitated by trained peer facilitators in a participatory style, encouraging participants to seek and develop relevant livelihoods for themselves through their own learning.

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Gibbs, A., Jewkes, R., Willan, S., & Washington, L. (2018). Associations between poverty, mental health and substance use, gender power, and intimate partner violence amongst young (18-30) women and men in urban informal settlements in South Africa: A cross-sectional study and structural equation model. PLoS one, 13(10), e0204956.

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Hatcher, A. M., Gibbs, A., Jewkes, R., McBride, R., Peacock, D., & Christofides, N. (n.d.). Effect of Childhood Poverty and Trauma on Adult Depressive Symptoms Among Young Men in Peri-Urban South African Settlements. Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Gibbs, A., Dunkle, K., Washington, L., Willan, S., Shai, N., & Jewkes, R. (2018). Childhood traumas as a risk factor for HIV-risk behaviours amongst young women and men living in urban informal settlements in South Africa: A cross-sectional study. PloS one, 13(4), e0195369.

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Gibbs A, Dunkle K, Jewkes R (2018) Emotional and economic intimate partner violence as key drivers of depression and suicidal ideation:A cross-sectional study among young women in informal settlements in South Africa. PLoS ONE 13 (4): e0194885. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0194885

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02 December 2017

When Nompu found a job

Project Empower and HEARD, Stepping Stones, Creating Futures Project, South Africa.

In 2012 *Nompu was one of the growing number of young women living in an urban informal settlement in South Africa. Nompu had moved from rural KwaZulu-Natal to Durban, a port city on the east coast of Africa, in the hope of finding a job and establishing a better life for herself. Yet, without completing her high school education, she struggled to find work. In the midst of high levels of unemployment, limited state support, dense living conditions and a struggle for survival, Nompu was often beaten by her boyfriend. Nompu’s boyfriend himself felt alienated from everyday life, without proper work and struggling to make a life for himself.

25 November 2017

Amanda finds her voice

Stepping Stones Creating Futures, South Africa.

When *Amanda looks around the community she grew up in, she does not see progress; instead, she sees high unemployment, teenage pregnancy, crime and many young women living in social isolation. Amanda is a 25-year-old woman from an informal settlement in South Africa. There are little to no employment opportunities in the community she lives in, or resources that could help her progress in life, which makes her feel, discouraged. The average past month earnings in the community where she lives are R169 (approx. 12 USD). Amanda describes herself as a person who is quiet, without any confidence and with a fear of doing anything wrong. She says this has made her vulnerable to many things growing up such as, having abusive and controlling boyfriends who offered her financial support on condition that she never challenged them. For Amanda, she was taught, from an early age that men are to be respected and feared and that they were the head of the family. Even if there were aspects in her relationship that she was not happy with, she held on to the belief that the man is God to you and you should never disagree with him.

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