Evidence HubWhat Works Resources

 

Clark, C. J., Ferguson, G., Shrestha, B., Shrestha, P. N., Oakes, J. M., Gupta, J., ... & Yount, K. M. (2018). Social norms and women's risk of intimate partner violence in Nepal. Social Science & Medicine.

pdf Download (359 KB)

Stern, E., Heise, L., & McLean, L. (2018). The doing and undoing of male household decision-making and economic authority in Rwanda and its implications for gender transformative programming. Culture, health & sexuality, 20(9), 976-991.

pdf Download (785 KB)

This presentation, given by Professor Rachel Jewkes, Executive Scientist in the office of the President, South African Medical Research Council and Consortium Director, What Works Global Programme, examines different types of IPV, and assesses the relative importance of key driving factors, including poverty, food insecurity, social norms regarding both gender and the use of violence, and disability. The presentation outlines tasks to combat IPV and illustrates the beneficial effects of economic empowerment and gender empowerment, and of changing social norms.

  pdf Download (33.36 MB)

This presentation, given by Henri Myrttinen, International Alert, looks at the ongoing work of a three-year project taking place in four villages in two districts of Tajikistan, featuring 271 beneficiaries. The ethnic Tajik and Uzbek villages are all affected by circular out-migration. Findings indicate among the highest levels of VAWG in the What Works consortium, caused in part by male labour migration (Russia, less to Kazakhstan), structural food insecurity (esp. women), low income levels, very high levels of economic precarity and living on debt, and substance abuse.

pdf Download (9.90 MB)

This presentation is an assessment of the approach, tools, challenges and successes of the Change intervention by Equal Access in Nepal. Changes noticed included increased communication between couples, joint decision-making, sharing of household chores, and participants learning to speak out against IPV and VAWG.

pdf Download (2.39 MB)

A household survey taken in Ituri, DRC, reveals shocking levels of IPV and sexual violence. This presentation looks at the benefits of engaging with faith groups to prevent violence in conflict-affected communities. It assesses the reach and influence of faith groups and leaders, and how they have the capacity to change gender attitude. This is facilitated by training faith leaders and gender champions, and a programme of community dialogues.

pdf Download (8.77 MB)

This presentation assesses the aims and efficacy of a programme seeking to foster change in knowledge, attitudes skills and behaviour to promote non-violent relationships. This involves creating enabling environments through training and supporting opinion leaders and promoting women’s safe spaces. It assesses the lessons learned from working with couples and from the women’s safe spaces.

pdf Download (12.91 MB)

08 December 2017

Tales of transformation

Right to Play, Pakistan

Faiza, Manzil , Nazreen, Saima, Anmol Rani and Nimra from class 7th of girl’s government school in, Hyderabad are best friends. The six girls are Junior Leaders of their school-based programme, Right To Play. This programme and their friendship is built on the opportunities for interaction that emerged through the Right To Play activities in their school.

Right to Play, Pakistan

A bright prospect for district Hyderabad’s under 17 girls cricket team, 14-year-old Hira, who goes to a girls’ secondary school in Pakistan, is an exceptional player despite her extremely poor background, and lacking basic resources.

Hira’s parents are illiterate; her father works as a mechanic in a workshop and so spending even the minimum on education was a luxury.

One Community, One Family Programme, Nepal

My name is Parbati*, I am 24-years-old, married, and live in Kathekhola Rural Municipality in Baglung district. This is my story.

I have been married for four years and there are seven people in my family, I live with my in-laws, my husband and my two sons. Before marriage, I always worried about the kind of family I would be getting married into, but I was one of the lucky ones and my new family is very understanding and supportive.

Page 7 of 16