Evidence HubWhat Works Resources

 

Reports

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & Social Norms
  • Country Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Project Tearfund - DRC

This report explores the key findings of a baseline quantitative household survey undertaken across 15 communities in Ituri Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in July 2015. The survey was conducted as part of the integrated research component of Tearfund’s project ‘Engaging with Faith Groups to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls in Conflict-affected Communities’, which is funded by UK aid from the UK government as part of the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls? Global Programme.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & Social Norms

This is the Mid Term Review (MTR) report of the DFID-funded, What Works to Prevent Violence

Against Women and Girls programme. Our evaluation objectives are, to:

  • Evaluate the programme’s performance against the overall programme outputs and outcomes at the mid-term and end of the programme;
  • Assess the quality of the research outputs, as this can impinge significantly on uptake;
  • Assess the extent to which evidence is being used to a) inform decisions to invest in end-VAWG policies and programmes in the global south and b) to maximise uptake.

IMC Worldwide was commissioned, in partnership with the University of Portsmouth (UoP) and CommsConsult, to design and deliver the mid-term (March 2017). Following almost immediately after the September - December 2016 inception phase, the evaluation team began the MTR in late January 2017 and finished on the 10th March 2017. This MTR timeline was very compressed, at the request of DFID, to provide information for DFID’s Annual Review (AR) of the programme.

The core team consists of Dr. Sheena Crawford (Team Leader), Dr Tamsin Bradley (Research Lead, University of Portsmouth (UoP), and Megan Lloyd-Laney (Research Uptake Lead; CommsConsult). Kate Conroy (Evaluation Specialist, IMC Worldwide), Professor Ruth Pearson (Professor Emerita, University of Leeds), and Dr Zara Ramsay (UoP) are additional evaluation team members, and Laura French-Constant (CommsConsult) provided Research Uptake (RU) inputs.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & Social Norms
  • Country Tajikistan
  • Project International Alert - Tajikistan

This report summarises the findings of the formative research phase of the ‘Living with dignity’ project, which is part of the broader ‘What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls’ programme funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID). It is based on qualitative field research conducted in the four target villages of the project, two of which were in Penjikent district, and two in Jomi district in Tajikistan, using focus group discussions and in- depth interviews conducted in November and December 2015. 

Authors: Subhiya Mastonshoeva, Umed Ibragimov and Henri Myrttinen
 

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & Education

This report is Volume 5 of the quarterly no-fee, open-access, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to what works in global health programmes. The publication includes editorials, commentaries, data visualisations, original articles, reviews, methodologies, field action reports, student articles and letters to the editor.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & Social Norms
  • Country Nepal
  • Project VSO International - Nepal

Intersections between traditional gender norms, women’s economic conditions and exposure to violence against women and girls: formative research in migrant communities of Baglung district, Nepal. This report summarises the findings of the formative research phase of the ‘Sammanit Jeevan’ project, based on qualitative field research conducted in two villages in the Baglung district of Nepal. The research focused on the following key areas:

  • Prevalent attitudes towards gender roles
  • Experiences of different forms of VAWG
  • Experience of male out-migration and the impact on young married women left behind
  • Existing services and response/support mechanisms for victims of VAWG
  • Assessing data on the prevalence and types of VAWG

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  • VAWG themes Costs of VAWG
  • Country Pakistan
  • Project Right to Play - Pakistan

This Working Paper provides the background for a project aiming to illustrate the invisible drag that VAWG places at every level of the Pakistani economy and society: on families, communities, businesses, institutions, and on the country as a whole. This is a three-year multi-country project that estimates the costs of VAWG, both social and economic, to individuals and households, businesses and communities, and states. It breaks new ground in understanding the impact of VAWG on community cohesion, economic stability and development, and will provide further evidence for governments and the international community to address violence against women and girls globally. This paper outlines the nature of VAWG in Pakistan, and the social and economic context in which it occurs. It begins with an introduction to the status of women in Pakistan, and the prevalence and types of VAWG that affect them. It explores the various contexts that are affected by violence: economic, social and political, and discusses the action that has been taken to address violence to date. It goes on to identify some literature on the costs of violence to society and the economy, and to highlight the gaps in the literature, which this project aims to fill.

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  • VAWG themes Costs of VAWG
  • Country Ghana
  • Project Gender Centre - Ghana

This working paper is an introduction to the analysis of the social and economic impacts of violence against women and girls in Ghana. This is a three-year multi-country project that estimates the costs of VAWG, both social and economic, to individuals and households, businesses and communities, and states. It breaks new ground in understanding the impact of VAWG on community cohesion, economic stability and development, and will provide further evidence for governments and the international community to address violence against women and girls globally. This paper outlines the nature of VAWG in Ghana, and the social and economic context in which it occurs. It begins with an introduction to the status of women in Ghana, and the prevalence and types of VAWG. It explores the various contexts that are affected by violence: economic, social and political, and discusses the action that has been taken to address violence to date. It goes on to identify some literature on the costs of violence to society and the economy, and to highlight the gaps in the literature, which this project aims to fill.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & Social Norms
  • Country India
  • Project Karnataka Health Promotion Trust - India

Violence persists in sex workers’ relationships with their intimate partners, an intervention and evaluation study, Samvedana Plus, was designed to understand and address violence and HIV risk in the intimate partnerships of female sex workers. Karnataka Health Promotion Trust (KHPT) is implementing Samvedana Plus, in partnership with Chaitanya AIDS Tadegattuwa Mahila Sangha, a communitybased organisation (CBO) of sex workers in northern Karnataka, India. The findings of the report are related to four broad categories: characteristics of the female sex workers and intimate partner relationships; gender attitudes, social norms and violence acceptance; experience of intimate partner violence, solidarity and self-worth; and STI/HIV risk perceptions, skills for self-protection and condom use among female sex workers.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & Social Norms

This report presents the findings of a global survey of 309 violence against women and girls (VAWG) stakeholders, including practitioners, policymakers, researchers and activists.  The anonymous online survey was completed between August-September 2014, with the link sent out through various VAWG networks, listservs and Twitter contacts. The survey aims to help the What Works to Prevent Violence programme learn how best to communicate findings to key stakeholders, by generating information on knowledge and understanding of primary prevention and perceived barriers to evidence-based prevention. These findings will be used to directly inform and advance the What Works to Prevent Violence communications and research uptake strategies.

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