Evidence HubWhat Works Resources

 

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Project Tearfund - DRC

What Works Learning Event, London
6th December

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & economic empowerment, VAWG & social norms
  • Country Rwanda
  • Project Indashyikirwa - Rwanda

Dr. Erin Stern
December 6 2017

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & conflict
  • Country South Sudan

Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is a serious human rights violation and an urgent global health and security challenge. It has been recognised as a key obstacle to development in the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). A ecting 35% of women globally, VAWG is both under-reported and under-addressed.1 In South Sudan, VAWG is widespread and while it predates the decades of con ict the country has endured, the on-going violence has exacerbated an already serious issue. Beginning with the civil war in 2013, South Sudan has been in a constant state of crisis, made more acute by extremely high levels of food insecurity and subsequent risk of famine and starvation. All of these factors have put women and girls at even greater risk of violence from both partners and non-partners.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & education, VAWG & social norms
  • Country Pakistan
  • Project Right to Play - Pakistan
Right to Play, Pakistan Faiza, Manzil , Nazreen, Saima, Anmol Rani and Nimra from class 7th of girl’s government school in, Hyderabad are best friends. The six girls are Junior Leaders of their school-based programme, Right To Play. This programme and their friendship is built on the opportunities for interaction…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & education, VAWG & social norms
  • Country Pakistan
  • Project Right to Play - Pakistan
Right to Play, Pakistan A bright prospect for district Hyderabad’s under 17 girls cricket team, 14-year-old Hira, who goes to a girls’ secondary school in Pakistan, is an exceptional player despite her extremely poor background, and lacking basic resources. Hira’s parents are illiterate; her father works as a mechanic in…
Right to Play, Pakistan Nazia is twenty from Hyderabad, she grew up in a very conservative religious family, and was not allowed to continue her regular education after her Intermediate school phase. According to her teacher, when Nazia was much younger, she was a very different person to who she…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & education, VAWG & social norms
  • Country Nepal
  • Project VSO International - Nepal
One Community, One Family Programme, Nepal My name is Parbati*, I am 24-years-old, married, and live in Kathekhola Rural Municipality in Baglung district. This is my story. I have been married for four years and there are seven people in my family, I live with my in-laws, my husband and…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Afghanistan
  • Project Help the Afghan Children - Afghanistan
Help the Afghan Children (HTAC), Afghanistan Shakira grew up in Afghanistan amidst more than four decades of war and conflict, which have severely impacted both social and psychological growth, resulting in conflict and violence becoming a common part of everyday life, particularly affecting children. Shakira was no exception and says…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & economic empowerment, VAWG & social norms
  • Country Rwanda
  • Project Indashyikirwa - Rwanda
I felt I had power within myself that allowed me to do something with my fellow women.. Indashyikirwa Programme, Rwanda

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Tajikistan
  • Project International Alert - Tajikistan
Zindagii Shoista: Living with Dignity, Tajikistan Firuzah is a 44-year-old married woman from Tajikistan. She had a difficult time adapting from economic dependency when her husband was deported from Russia, where he worked as a labour migrant, and lost his job. When Firuzah’s husband lost his job and could no…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & education, VAWG & social norms
  • Country Tajikistan
  • Project International Alert - Tajikistan
Zindagii Shoista: Living with Dignity, Tajikistan Gulshan is an unmarried 21-year-old woman from Tajikistan, who aims to graduate from a University this year. She participated in the International Alert-led Zindagii Shoista - Living with Dignity’ project last year.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & education, VAWG & economic empowerment, VAWG & social norms
  • Country India, South Africa
  • Project Karnataka Health Promotion Trust - India, Stepping Stones and Creating Futures - South Africa
Project Empower and HEARD, Stepping Stones, Creating Futures Project, South Africa. In 2012 *Nompu was one of the growing number of young women living in an urban informal settlement in South Africa. Nompu had moved from rural KwaZulu-Natal to Durban, a port city on the east coast of Africa, in…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country India
  • Project Karnataka Health Promotion Trust - India
Karnataka Health Promotion Trust, Samvedana Plus project, India   David* is a 25 year old man, who works as driver and is married. He has had an ongoing intimate relationship with a FSW for more than seven years. They have had a difficult relationship for many years, which has often led…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & economic empowerment, VAWG & social norms
  • Country South Sudan
  • Project Indashyikirwa - Rwanda
     safe place main
 

Main Results Report 2017

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Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is a serious human rights violation and a significant global health and security issue. Studies suggest that the rates, perpetrators and types of VAWG fluctuate during conflict; and there is some evidence that sexual violence against both women and men increases during conflict. The global prevalence of sexual violence among refugees and displaced persons in humanitarian crises is estimated to be 21.4%, suggesting that approximately one in five women who are refugees or displaced by an emergency experience sexual violence. Recent studies indicate that intimate partner violence (IPV) may be more common than conflict-related sexual assault; however, both IPV and conflict-related violence are under-reported in these settings. Though several studies have collected robust data on VAWG in humanitarian settings, many experts argue that our overall understanding of the issue remains limited.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country India
  • Project Karnataka Health Promotion Trust - India
Karnataka Health Promotion Trust, Samvedana Plus project, India   Gowri* is a 35-year-old sex worker with a daily clientele. She has two regular intimate partners, with whom she reports being very compatible. As a result, she does not experience violence in intimate relationships. Given the intimacy and trust she enjoys with…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Tajikistan
  • Project International Alert - Tajikistan
Zindagii Shoista: Living with Dignity, Tajikistan *Alisher is a 50-year-old married man from Tajikistan. He has five children, two sons and three daughters.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Nepal
  • Project Equal Access - Nepal
Change Starts at Home, Nepal “In the past my husband used to abuse me. He didn’t count me or our daughters as human beings… he used to force me into having sex.” That is how Bikani, a Nepali woman, with two daughters, initially summarized her ten-year marriage. The experience of…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & economic empowerment, VAWG & social norms
  • Country Bangladesh
  • Project HERrespect - Bangladesh
HERrespect, Bangladesh Engaging male supervisors to tackle violence at work in the ready-made garment sector of Bangladesh

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Tajikistan
  • Project International Alert - Tajikistan
Zindagii Shoista: Living with Dignity, Tajikistan Gulina* is a young woman from Tajikistan. She was married at an early age to Zafar*, a labour migrant, and lives with her extended family, as is tradition in the region.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country South Africa
  • Project Stepping Stones and Creating Futures - South Africa
Stepping Stones Creating Futures, South Africa. When *Amanda looks around the community she grew up in, she does not see progress; instead, she sees high unemployment, teenage pregnancy, crime and many young women living in social isolation. Amanda is a 25-year-old woman from an informal settlement in South Africa. There…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & education
  • Country Afghanistan

Globally, one in three women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence in their lifetime (WHO 2013). In Afghanistan, recent demographic and health survey data (CSO 2017) indicates that the prevalence of intimate partner violence (emotional, physical or sexual) perpetrated against women aged 15 to 49 is 56%, ranging from between 7% and 92% across different provinces. Based on the baseline for an impact evaluation of Women for Women International’s programme in Afghanistan, this brief describes the factors associated with physical and emotional intimate partner violence. The brief is intended for employees of governmental and non-governmental organisations, and donors, interested in working to prevent violence against women before it occurs.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & education
  • Country Afghanistan

Globally, 17% of children are subjected to extreme forms of corporal punishment (UNICEF 2014). National level data in Afghanistan suggests that 78% of children aged 5 to 14 have experienced any violent psychological or physical discipline, and more than a third of children are subjected to extreme physical violence (UNICEF 2014). Based on the baseline study of a project implemented in Afghanistan by Help the Afghan Children, this brief describes the factors associated with violence at school, including children’s experience of corporal punishment by teachers and their experiences of peer violence victimisation or perpetration. The brief is intended for those working in governmental and nongovernmental organisations, and donors, interested in working to prevent violence against children.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms

Last month the Research to Action Roundtable series brought together a group of evaluators from the DFID-funded What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls programme. The panelists included Professor Tamsin Bradley (Evaluation Research Lead), Dr Sheena Crawford (Team Lead on Performance Evaluation), Katherine Liakos from IMC (project managers of the evaluation), and Megan Lloyd-Laney (Research Uptake Lead). The Roundtable comprised discussions of the objectives and approaches of the evaluation process, insights into challenges unique to a programme of this type as well as the broader learning outcomes that could be shared with the wider evaluation community.

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Additional Info

  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms

See the latest version of the communication protocol here

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & education
  • Country South Africa

 

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms

This study presents the results of the formative research phase of a larger project that was funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and that was supported by the ‘What Works’ consortium to prevent violence against women and girls (VAWG). This project titled: “Utilising Innovative Media to End Violence against Women and Girls Through community Education and Outreach” was undertaken in the occupied Palestinian territories (oPt). It was implemented by Ma’an Network in strategic collaboration with 16 local partner non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in the oPt. It focuses on all areas of the West Bank and Gaza. The formative research was carried out by the Arab World for Research and Development (AWRAD)…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country South Africa

 

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & disability
  • Country Afghanistan, Ghana, Nepal, South Africa
  • Project Equal Access - Nepal, Gender Centre - Ghana, Help the Afghan Children - Afghanistan, Right to Play - Pakistan, Stepping Stones and Creating Futures - South Africa
  • Author Ingrid van der Heijden and Kristin Dunkle
  • Date of publication September 2017

The What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Global Programme has carried out research to better understand how to prevent violence against women and girls living with disabilities, who are at an increased risk of violence, abuse, neglect, maltreatment and exploitation. Women and girls with disabilities also face additional pressures because they are regarded as unable to meet the social roles and expectations on women and girls to attract men, marry, bear children, or care for families. This can result in further social exclusion, which may contribute to development of depression or other mental illness, in addition to increasing their physical and economic vulnerabilities. While the evidence base is limited, this evidence brief identifies promising strategies to prevent violence against women girls with disabilities.

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