Evidence HubWhat Works Resources

 

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Nepal
  • Project Equal Access - Nepal
Change Starts at Home, Nepal “In the past my husband used to abuse me. He didn’t count me or our daughters as human beings… he used to force me into having sex.” That is how Bikani, a Nepali woman, with two daughters, initially summarized her ten-year marriage. The experience of…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & economic empowerment, VAWG & social norms
  • Country Bangladesh
  • Project HERrespect - Bangladesh
HERrespect, Bangladesh Engaging male supervisors to tackle violence at work in the ready-made garment sector of Bangladesh

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Tajikistan
  • Project International Alert - Tajikistan
Zindagii Shoista: Living with Dignity, Tajikistan Gulina* is a young woman from Tajikistan. She was married at an early age to Zafar*, a labour migrant, and lives with her extended family, as is tradition in the region.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country South Africa
  • Project Stepping Stones and Creating Futures - South Africa
Stepping Stones Creating Futures, South Africa. When *Amanda looks around the community she grew up in, she does not see progress; instead, she sees high unemployment, teenage pregnancy, crime and many young women living in social isolation. Amanda is a 25-year-old woman from an informal settlement in South Africa. There…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & education
  • Country Afghanistan

Globally, one in three women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence in their lifetime (WHO 2013). In Afghanistan, recent demographic and health survey data (CSO 2017) indicates that the prevalence of intimate partner violence (emotional, physical or sexual) perpetrated against women aged 15 to 49 is 56%, ranging from between 7% and 92% across different provinces. Based on the baseline for an impact evaluation of Women for Women International’s programme in Afghanistan, this brief describes the factors associated with physical and emotional intimate partner violence. The brief is intended for employees of governmental and non-governmental organisations, and donors, interested in working to prevent violence against women before it occurs.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & education
  • Country Afghanistan

Globally, 17% of children are subjected to extreme forms of corporal punishment (UNICEF 2014). National level data in Afghanistan suggests that 78% of children aged 5 to 14 have experienced any violent psychological or physical discipline, and more than a third of children are subjected to extreme physical violence (UNICEF 2014). Based on the baseline study of a project implemented in Afghanistan by Help the Afghan Children, this brief describes the factors associated with violence at school, including children’s experience of corporal punishment by teachers and their experiences of peer violence victimisation or perpetration. The brief is intended for those working in governmental and nongovernmental organisations, and donors, interested in working to prevent violence against children.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms

Last month the Research to Action Roundtable series brought together a group of evaluators from the DFID-funded What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls programme. The panelists included Professor Tamsin Bradley (Evaluation Research Lead), Dr Sheena Crawford (Team Lead on Performance Evaluation), Katherine Liakos from IMC (project managers of the evaluation), and Megan Lloyd-Laney (Research Uptake Lead). The Roundtable comprised discussions of the objectives and approaches of the evaluation process, insights into challenges unique to a programme of this type as well as the broader learning outcomes that could be shared with the wider evaluation community.

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Additional Info

  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms

See the latest version of the communication protocol here

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Additional Info

  • VAWG themes VAWG & education
  • Country South Africa

 

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms

This study presents the results of the formative research phase of a larger project that was funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and that was supported by the ‘What Works’ consortium to prevent violence against women and girls (VAWG). This project titled: “Utilising Innovative Media to End Violence against Women and Girls Through community Education and Outreach” was undertaken in the occupied Palestinian territories (oPt). It was implemented by Ma’an Network in strategic collaboration with 16 local partner non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in the oPt. It focuses on all areas of the West Bank and Gaza. The formative research was carried out by the Arab World for Research and Development (AWRAD)…

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country South Africa

 

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & disability
  • Country Afghanistan, Ghana, Nepal, South Africa
  • Project Equal Access - Nepal, Gender Centre - Ghana, Help the Afghan Children - Afghanistan, Right to Play - Pakistan, Stepping Stones and Creating Futures - South Africa
  • Author Ingrid van der Heijden and Kristin Dunkle
  • Date of publication September 2017

The What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Global Programme has carried out research to better understand how to prevent violence against women and girls living with disabilities, who are at an increased risk of violence, abuse, neglect, maltreatment and exploitation. Women and girls with disabilities also face additional pressures because they are regarded as unable to meet the social roles and expectations on women and girls to attract men, marry, bear children, or care for families. This can result in further social exclusion, which may contribute to development of depression or other mental illness, in addition to increasing their physical and economic vulnerabilities. While the evidence base is limited, this evidence brief identifies promising strategies to prevent violence against women girls with disabilities.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Nepal
  • Project Equal Access - Nepal

Download the Change starts at home Infographic capturing the baseline research data.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Project Tearfund - DRC

This report explores the key findings of a baseline quantitative household survey undertaken across 15 communities in Ituri Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in July 2015. The survey was conducted as part of the integrated research component of Tearfund’s project ‘Engaging with Faith Groups to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls in Conflict-affected Communities’, which is funded by UK aid from the UK government as part of the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls? Global Programme.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & education
  • Country Kenya

“ We never report when boys touch our private parts at school because we shall be punished by our teacher, and I am very scared of telling my parent.”
Ujamaa-­‐Africa: Addressing Violence against Girls through a school based intervention in informal settlements in Nairobi.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Democratic Republic of Congo

Sexual violence is prevalent in many conflict-affected environments, including the Democratic Republic of Congo, where it is reported that 1.8 million women have been raped in their lifetime. According to the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, conflict-related sexual violence is one of the most critical challenges faced by the people and government of the DRC.

Under the £25 million What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls programme, Tearfund was funded by the UK Government to implement a project – ‘Engaging with Faith Groups to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls in Conflict-affected Communities’. This policy paper, drawing on research conducted by Tearfund, reveals that faith leaders indeed have unique reach and influence within conflict-affected communities and a mandate to speak into these issues. If mobilised and equipped, they could play a key role in more effective prevention of and response to VAWG.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & economic empowerment, VAWG & social norms
  • Country Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, South Africa, Tajikistan
  • Project HERrespect - Bangladesh, International Alert - Tajikistan, Stepping Stones and Creating Futures - South Africa, VSO International - Nepal, Women for Women International Trial - Afghanistan
  • Author Andrew Gibbs, Nata Duvvury and Stacey Scriver
  • Date of publication September 2017

Poverty is a key driver of intimate partner violence (IPV). Women living in poorer places with lower socio-economic status, higher food insecurity, and less access to education and work opportunities are more likely to experience IPV. In addition, women without economic and social resources find it harder to leave abusive relationships. To date, women’s economic empowerment interventions have been central to IPV prevention approaches. This evidence review, however, suggests that women’s involvement in economic interventions has mixed effects on their vulnerability to IPV and can in fact increase the risks of their experiencing IPV, especially in situations where women’s participation in paid economic activity is the exception to the norm. Evidence suggests that interventions that aim to increase women’s access to work need to focus simultaneously on socially empowering women and transforming community gender norms to maximize the positive impact of women’s work on women’s empowerment and help prevent VAWG.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Pakistan, South Africa
  • Project Right to Play - Pakistan, Stepping Stones and Creating Futures - South Africa
  • Author Emma Fulu, Sarah McCook and Kathryn Falb
  • Date of publication September 2017

Violence against women (VAW) and violence against children (VAC) are violations of human rights and global public health priorities. Historically, work to address VAW and VAC have often occurred separately or in silos. This evidence note, however, draws attention to the growing body of evidence on the intersections of VAW and VAC, including risk factors, common social norms, co-occurrence, and the intergenerational cycle of abuse. It presents promising programmatic approaches to prevent and respond to both forms of violence; and policy recommendations, which include prioritising prevention efforts with adolescent girls that challenge gender norms and build girls’ agency.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms

This is the Mid Term Review (MTR) report of the DFID-funded, What Works to Prevent Violence

Against Women and Girls programme. Our evaluation objectives are, to:

  • Evaluate the programme’s performance against the overall programme outputs and outcomes at the mid-term and end of the programme;
  • Assess the quality of the research outputs, as this can impinge significantly on uptake;
  • Assess the extent to which evidence is being used to a) inform decisions to invest in end-VAWG policies and programmes in the global south and b) to maximise uptake.

IMC Worldwide was commissioned, in partnership with the University of Portsmouth (UoP) and CommsConsult, to design and deliver the mid-term (March 2017). Following almost immediately after the September - December 2016 inception phase, the evaluation team began the MTR in late January 2017 and finished on the 10th March 2017. This MTR timeline was very compressed, at the request of DFID, to provide information for DFID’s Annual Review (AR) of the programme.

The core team consists of Dr. Sheena Crawford (Team Leader), Dr Tamsin Bradley (Research Lead, University of Portsmouth (UoP), and Megan Lloyd-Laney (Research Uptake Lead; CommsConsult). Kate Conroy (Evaluation Specialist, IMC Worldwide), Professor Ruth Pearson (Professor Emerita, University of Leeds), and Dr Zara Ramsay (UoP) are additional evaluation team members, and Laura French-Constant (CommsConsult) provided Research Uptake (RU) inputs.

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Tajikistan
  • Project International Alert - Tajikistan

This report summarises the findings of the formative research phase of the ‘Living with dignity’ project, which is part of the broader ‘What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls’ programme funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID). It is based on qualitative field research conducted in the four target villages of the project, two of which were in Penjikent district, and two in Jomi district in Tajikistan, using focus group discussions and in- depth interviews conducted in November and December 2015. 

Authors: Subhiya Mastonshoeva, Umed Ibragimov and Henri Myrttinen
 

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  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms

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