Project

Evidence

This flyer presents key findings of research undertaken by ISSER in collaboration with National University of Ireland, Galway, International Center for Research on Women, and Ipsos MORI with funding from UK Department for International Development. The research design includes nationally representative survey of 2002 women aged 18-60 across the 10 regions of Ghana, qualitative research including focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, and key informant interviews, and survey of 805 employees (391 female and 414 male employees) across 100 businesses in Accra and Kumasi.

pdf Download (2.78 MB)

15 February 2019

When the Gender Centre conceptualized its Nkyinkyim Anti-violence Project/Rural Response System, it recognized the need to put together a comprehensive training programme for its partners to ensure a full understanding of violence against women in order to be able to respond effectively to victims of violence in those communities where its partners operated. The training programme was also intended to train other civil society organisations as well as state agencies such as the Police, health and social welfare personnel and indeed all stakeholders who interacted with victims of violence in any way. The manual has been the main resource for training of our COMBAT members.

If you would like to get access to the full curricula please email Dorcas Coker-Appiah at d.cokerappiah@gendercentreghana.org

pdf Download (530 KB)

17 October 2018

Alangea, D. O., Addo-Lartey, A. A., Sikweyiya, Y., Chirwa, E. D., Coker-Appiah, D., Jewkes, R., & Adanu, R. M. K. (2018). Prevalence and risk factors of intimate partner violence among women in four districts of the central region of Ghana: Baseline findings from a cluster randomised controlled trial. PloS one, 13(7), e0200874.

pdf Download (1.40 MB)

18 September 2018

In Ghana, violence against women and girls is widespread. Recent estimates indicate that 28% of women report at least one form of violence in the past year and 45% report experiencing violence at some point in their lifetime. COMBAT (Community Based Action Teams) is a rural response strategy that aims to (i) reduce the incidence of VAWG in rural communities in Ghana, (ii) protect women’s rights via state and community structures; and, (iii) raise public awareness about the causes and consequences of VAWG. This evidence suggests that community-led evidence-based interventions supported by local actors (e.g. traditional and religious leaders) are uniquely placed to support prevention of, and response to, VAWG in this context.

pdf Download (571 KB)

01 June 2018

Chirwa, E. D., Sikweyiya, Y., Addo-Lartey, A. A., Alangea, D. O., Coker-Appiah, D., Adanu, R. M., & Jewkes, R. (2018). Prevalence and risk factors of physical or sexual intimate violence perpetration amongst men in four districts in the central region of Ghana: Baseline findings from a cluster randomised controlled trial. PloS one, 13(3), e0191663. 

pdf Download (1.31 MB)

01 April 2018

Prof Rachel Jewkes

Executive Scientist in the office of the President, South African Medical Research Council

Consortium Director, What Works Global Programme

  pdf Download (33.36 MB)

12 December 2017

The What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Global Programme has carried out research to better understand how to prevent violence against women and girls living with disabilities, who are at an increased risk of violence, abuse, neglect, maltreatment and exploitation. Women and girls with disabilities also face additional pressures because they are regarded as unable to meet the social roles and expectations on women and girls to attract men, marry, bear children, or care for families. This can result in further social exclusion, which may contribute to development of depression or other mental illness, in addition to increasing their physical and economic vulnerabilities. While the evidence base is limited, this evidence brief identifies promising strategies to prevent violence against women girls with disabilities.

pdf Download (1019 KB)

18 September 2017
Page 1 of 2