Project

Evidence

Over the last two decades, the global community has come to recognise the profound impact of violence on the lives of women and girls. This fundamentally undermines their health and well-being, and stands as a barrier to women’s full participation in global development and the economic and civic life of their communities. This evidence brief outlines the effective design and implementation elements in interventions to prevent violence against women and girls emanating from the UKAID-funded, What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls (What Works) programme, a six-year, £25-million investment in VAWG prevention.

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21 February 2020

Over the last two decades, the global community has come to recognise the profound impact of violence on the lives of women and girls. This fundamentally undermines their health and well-being, and stands as a barrier to women’s full participation in global development and the economic and civic life of their communities. This evidence brief outlines the effective design and implementation elements in interventions to prevent violence against women and girls emanating from the UKAID-funded, What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls (What Works) programme, a six-year, £25-million investment in VAWG prevention.

  pdf DOWNLOAD (282 KB)

20 February 2020

Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is preventable. Over the last two decades, VAWG prevention practitioners and researchers have been developing and testing interventions to stop violence from occurring, in addition to mitigating its consequences. This rigorous, in-depth review of the state of the field presents what is now known five years on after the UKAID-funded, What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls (What Works) programme, a six year investment, in advancing our understanding of What Works within the context of the wider evidence base.

  pdf DOWNLOAD (9.61 MB)

19 February 2020

Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is preventable. Over the last two decades, VAWG prevention practitioners and researchers have been developing and testing interventions to stop violence from occurring, in addition to mitigating its consequences. This document is an executive summary of the longer review of the state of the field of VAWG prevention, five years on after the UKAID-funded, What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls (What Works) programme, a six year investment, in advancing our understanding of What Works within the context of the wider evidence base.

  pdf DOWNLOAD (2.43 MB)

19 February 2020

Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is driven in part by gender attitudes, norms on gender inequality and the acceptability of violence, which are socially reproduced and shared. Women’s rights organizations across the global south have dedicated themselves to challenging these. Early evaluations of work they have championed has shown that sufficiently equipped community volunteers, guided in a long-term structured programme, can enable widespread diffusion of new ideas on gender and VAWG and ultimately achieve changes in harmful attitudes and norms across communities.

DFID’s What Works to Prevent Violence against Women and Girls Global Programme (What Works) has generated new evidence on the effect of these interventions in a range of settings – from rural areas and small towns of the Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ghana, Rwanda, Nepal, to urban informal settlements in South Africa. Rigorous evaluations have shown the potential for preventing VAWG through multi-year, intensive change interventions with welltrained and supported community action teams, that purposefully engage both women and men to effect change.

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28 September 2019

Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is an important human rights concern and a pervasive issue affecting women and girls during times of conflict and humanitarian crisis. In 2016, the What Works to Prevent VAWG programme published an evidence brief [GF1] summarising the existing evidence base on VAWG in these settings. While the brief demonstrated that there is very limited evidence on what works to prevent and respond to VAWG in conflict and humanitarian settings, it did highlight key areas of learning and specify what information gaps remain.

Since the publication of the 2016 What Works evidence brief, researchers and practitioners have continued to conduct research and expand the international community’s knowledge base around VAWG and the effectiveness of programmes that seek to prevent and respond to this violence. These efforts include new results from eight research studies conducted by members of the What Works consortium in various conflict-affected and humanitarian settings. This new brief synthesises the key results of these What Works studies as well as other key findings from contemporaneous research efforts published since 2015. It aims to provide an up-to-date resource for practitioners, policymakers and researchers on the state of evidence on VAWG in conflict and humanitarian settings.

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26 September 2019

Promouvoir des relations respectueuses et des communautés équitables

Les dialogues communautaires sont un outil que les champions de genre (défenseurs de l’égalité hommes-femmes) peuvent utiliser pour animer des sessions de réflexion et de dialogue. Leur but ultime est que les personnes qui y participent soient transformées. Cet outil sera d’autant plus efficace s’il est utilisé dans le contexte de l’approche Transformer les masculinités. Les thèmes de discussion sont respectivement adaptés au groupe de femmes et au groupe d’hommes, qui sont censés se réunir pour une réflexion commune lors de la sixième semaine.

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10 October 2018

Les « champions de genre » sont des hommes et des femmes qui se portent volontaires au sein des communautés pour inspirer et faciliter des changements relatifs aux normes de genre, à l’égalité hommes-femmes et au rôle de la foi. L’objectif est d’accompagner un changement de comportement individuel et de changer les normes sociales liées au genre, aux masculinités et aux violences sexuelles basées sur le genre.

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10 October 2018

Une femme et une fille sur trois subiront des violences physiques ou sexuelles au cours de leur vie. Cela représente un milliard de femmes et de filles dans le monde aujourd’hui. Les violences à l’égard des femmes et des filles existent dans toutes les sphères et les strates de la société, sous diverses formes, comme le viol, la maltraitance physique, le harcèlement et la discrimination. La violence sexuelle et basée sur le genre (VSBG) empêche les femmes et les filles de vivre dans la dignité. C’est pourquoi il faut impérativement y mettre fin.

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10 October 2018
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