Project

  • One Community One Family One Community One Family

    Nepal | VSO International

    The One Community One Family project addresses factors related to migration in Nepal including the changing roles and identities of men and women in migrant communities that are seen to be driving a rise in VAWG. The project will provide migrant women with livelihood training and link them to microfinance institutions, and will work with the wider community to provide counseling, access to support services, and drive local advocacy activities.

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Evidence

This study draws on three case countries – Nepal, Sierra Leone and South Sudan – to address gaps in evidence and understanding on violence against women and girls (VAWG) during post-conflict transition. It highlights the potential for state-building and peacebuilding processes to address VAWG, and the effect this has in advancing sustainable peace.

This is the first time that a systematic approach has been taken to bridge the gap between VAWG and post-conflict state-building / peace-building policies and processes. The study was led by the George Washington Institute (GWI), CARE International UK and International Rescue Committee (IRC).

This policy brief summarises findings from the study for policy makers.

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28 September 2018

Cardoso, L. F., Clark, C. J., Rivers, K., Ferguson, G., Shrestha, B., & Gupta, J. (2018). Menstrual restriction prevalence and association with intimate partner violence among Nepali women. BMJ Sex Reprod Health, bmjsrh-2017.

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24 August 2018

Clark, C. J., Ferguson, G., Shrestha, B., Shrestha, P. N., Oakes, J. M., Gupta, J., ... & Yount, K. M. (2018). Social norms and women's risk of intimate partner violence in Nepal. Social Science & Medicine.

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01 January 2018

This presentation is an assessment of the approach, tools, challenges and successes of the Change intervention by Equal Access in Nepal. Changes noticed included increased communication between couples, joint decision-making, sharing of household chores, and participants learning to speak out against IPV and VAWG.

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12 December 2017

One Community, One Family Programme, Nepal

My name is Parbati*, I am 24-years-old, married, and live in Kathekhola Rural Municipality in Baglung district. This is my story.

I have been married for four years and there are seven people in my family, I live with my in-laws, my husband and my two sons. Before marriage, I always worried about the kind of family I would be getting married into, but I was one of the lucky ones and my new family is very understanding and supportive.

07 December 2017

Change Starts at Home, Nepal

“In the past my husband used to abuse me. He didn’t count me or our daughters as human beings… he used to force me into having sex.” That is how Bikani, a Nepali woman, with two daughters, initially summarized her ten-year marriage. The experience of Ashram and Bikani is not uncommon in Nepal. A recent study carried out by Equal Access International (hyperlink) and Emory University found that 34% of survey respondents had experienced intimate partner violence in their lifetime and 25% had experienced physical or sexual abuse from their spouse in the past 12 months.

28 November 2017

The What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Global Programme has carried out research to better understand how to prevent violence against women and girls living with disabilities, who are at an increased risk of violence, abuse, neglect, maltreatment and exploitation. Women and girls with disabilities also face additional pressures because they are regarded as unable to meet the social roles and expectations on women and girls to attract men, marry, bear children, or care for families. This can result in further social exclusion, which may contribute to development of depression or other mental illness, in addition to increasing their physical and economic vulnerabilities. While the evidence base is limited, this evidence brief identifies promising strategies to prevent violence against women girls with disabilities.

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18 September 2017

Download the Change starts at home Infographic capturing the baseline research data.

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11 September 2017

Poverty is a key driver of intimate partner violence (IPV). Women living in poorer places with lower socio-economic status, higher food insecurity, and less access to education and work opportunities are more likely to experience IPV. In addition, women without economic and social resources find it harder to leave abusive relationships. To date, women’s economic empowerment interventions have been central to IPV prevention approaches. This evidence review, however, suggests that women’s involvement in economic interventions has mixed effects on their vulnerability to IPV and can in fact increase the risks of their experiencing IPV, especially in situations where women’s participation in paid economic activity is the exception to the norm. Evidence suggests that interventions that aim to increase women’s access to work need to focus simultaneously on socially empowering women and transforming community gender norms to maximize the positive impact of women’s work on women’s empowerment and help prevent VAWG.

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01 September 2017
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