Projects

  • One Man Can – Preventing Men’s Use of Violence in Southern Africa One Man Can – Preventing Men’s Use of Violence in Southern Africa

    South Africa | Sonke Gender Justice

    This project will refine and test a multi-level model for reducing violence against women and girls (VAWG) in urban South Africa using a cluster randomised controlled trial design. It will expand a gender-transformative programme called One Man Can (OMC) by adding community mobilisation and advocacy, and more squarely focus on preventing violence against women and girls.

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  • Stepping Stones and Creating Futures Stepping Stones and Creating Futures

    South Africa | Project Empower

    Stepping Stones and Creating Futures aims to reduce rates of intimate partner violence in urban areas in South Africa. The programme runs peer-to-peer training sessions with 18-24 year olds. In these sessions participants develop livelihoods strategies and are involved in discussions, role plays, dramas and games that encourage participants to reflect on social norms around gender and the use of violence.

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Evidence

This report covers the third capacity development workshop under the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) programme, held in Pretoria, South Africa from 3rd to 4th July 2017. It was an opportunity for implementers, researchers and technical staff to share learning and build skills across the programme. The workshop was structured around three broad themes: Building core skills on research uptake; relationship building and technical sharing between grantees and the What Works consortium members; and supporting south-to-south learning. This report summarises the highlights and key messages from each of the sessions.

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17 October 2017

The What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Global Programme has carried out research to better understand how to prevent violence against women and girls living with disabilities, who are at an increased risk of violence, abuse, neglect, maltreatment and exploitation. Women and girls with disabilities also face additional pressures because they are regarded as unable to meet the social roles and expectations on women and girls to attract men, marry, bear children, or care for families. This can result in further social exclusion, which may contribute to development of depression or other mental illness, in addition to increasing their physical and economic vulnerabilities. While the evidence base is limited, this evidence brief identifies promising strategies to prevent violence against women girls with disabilities.

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18 September 2017

Poverty is a key driver of intimate partner violence (IPV). Women living in poorer places with lower socio-economic status, higher food insecurity, and less access to education and work opportunities are more likely to experience IPV. In addition, women without economic and social resources find it harder to leave abusive relationships. To date, women’s economic empowerment interventions have been central to IPV prevention approaches. This evidence review, however, suggests that women’s involvement in economic interventions has mixed effects on their vulnerability to IPV and can in fact increase the risks of their experiencing IPV, especially in situations where women’s participation in paid economic activity is the exception to the norm. Evidence suggests that interventions that aim to increase women’s access to work need to focus simultaneously on socially empowering women and transforming community gender norms to maximize the positive impact of women’s work on women’s empowerment and help prevent VAWG.

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01 September 2017

Violence against women (VAW) and violence against children (VAC) are violations of human rights and global public health priorities. Historically, work to address VAW and VAC have often occurred separately or in silos. This evidence note, however, draws attention to the growing body of evidence on the intersections of VAW and VAC, including risk factors, common social norms, co-occurrence, and the intergenerational cycle of abuse. It presents promising programmatic approaches to prevent and respond to both forms of violence; and policy recommendations, which include prioritising prevention efforts with adolescent girls that challenge gender norms and build girls’ agency.

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01 September 2017

This brief document covers the role of social contexts in shaping the transformation of masculinities in a gender transformative and livelihood strengthening intervention in South Africa. The brief looks at the issue of high HIV incidence and intimate partner violence in urban informal settlements of South Africa, and the role of youthful hypermasculinity that prioritizes sexual dominance and displays of violence. The intervention took the form of a gender transformative and livelihood strengthening intervention to reduce HIV risk and IPV perpetration, and its efficacy was tested in thirty-eight in-depth interviews and three focus groups post-intervention. The results and conclusions are assessed.

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26 June 2017

Most evidence on violence against women comes from speaking with women. It is crucial to understand how men themselves report using violence against women, and to identify ways to intervene in this human rights challenge. There is an urgent need to engage men in challenging rigid ideas about manhood and encourage men to become agents of change in their own communities. Researchers studied feedback from men from a peri-urban community on the outskirts of Johannesburg, where many people live in informal settlements. Men taking part were between 18 to 40 years old, with the average participant aged 27. This brief outlines the findings.

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06 June 2017
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