Project

  • Preventing Violence Against Women and Girls through School based Programmes Preventing Violence Against Women and Girls through School based Programmes

    Pakistan, Hyderabad District, Sindh Province | Preventing Violence Against Women and Girls through Sport and Play

    Since 2002, Right to Play has worked with hundreds of thousands of children and young people in Pakistan, to shift the social norms that perpetuate and condone violence. Through its schools-based Sport and Play programme, teachers are provided with curricula and trained to challenge the acceptability of VAWG.

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Right to Play, Pakistan

Faiza, Manzil , Nazreen, Saima, Anmol Rani and Nimra from class 7th of girl’s government school in, Hyderabad are best friends. The six girls are Junior Leaders of their school-based programme, Right To Play. This programme and their friendship is built on the opportunities for interaction that emerged through the Right To Play activities in their school.

08 December 2017

Right to Play, Pakistan

A bright prospect for district Hyderabad’s under 17 girls cricket team, 14-year-old Hira, who goes to a girls’ secondary school in Pakistan, is an exceptional player despite her extremely poor background, and lacking basic resources.

Hira’s parents are illiterate; her father works as a mechanic in a workshop and so spending even the minimum on education was a luxury.

08 December 2017

The What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Global Programme has carried out research to better understand how to prevent violence against women and girls living with disabilities, who are at an increased risk of violence, abuse, neglect, maltreatment and exploitation. Women and girls with disabilities also face additional pressures because they are regarded as unable to meet the social roles and expectations on women and girls to attract men, marry, bear children, or care for families. This can result in further social exclusion, which may contribute to development of depression or other mental illness, in addition to increasing their physical and economic vulnerabilities. While the evidence base is limited, this evidence brief identifies promising strategies to prevent violence against women girls with disabilities.

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18 September 2017

Violence against women (VAW) and violence against children (VAC) are violations of human rights and global public health priorities. Historically, work to address VAW and VAC have often occurred separately or in silos. This evidence note, however, draws attention to the growing body of evidence on the intersections of VAW and VAC, including risk factors, common social norms, co-occurrence, and the intergenerational cycle of abuse. It presents promising programmatic approaches to prevent and respond to both forms of violence; and policy recommendations, which include prioritising prevention efforts with adolescent girls that challenge gender norms and build girls’ agency.

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01 September 2017

Saeed Ali T , Karmaliani. R,, Mcfarlane. J., Khuwaja. H.M.A; Somani Y, Chirwa E.D.,& Jewkes. R. (2017). Attitude towards Gender Roles and violence against women and Girls (VAWG): Baseline Findings from an RCT of 1,752 Youth in Pakistan. Global Health Action, 10, 1342454

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01 July 2017

Asad, N.; Karmaliani,R.; McFarlane,J.; Bhamani, SS.; Somani, Y.; Chirwa, E. & Jewkes, R. (2017). The Intersection of Adolescent Depression and Peer Violence: Baseline Results from A Randomized Controlled Trial of 1,752 Youth in Pakistan. Child and Adolescent Mental Health 22, No. 4, 2017, pp. 232–241

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01 June 2017

This Working Paper provides the background for a project aiming to illustrate the invisible drag that VAWG places at every level of the Pakistani economy and society: on families, communities, businesses, institutions, and on the country as a whole. This is a three-year multi-country project that estimates the costs of VAWG, both social and economic, to individuals and households, businesses and communities, and states. It breaks new ground in understanding the impact of VAWG on community cohesion, economic stability and development, and will provide further evidence for governments and the international community to address violence against women and girls globally. This paper outlines the nature of VAWG in Pakistan, and the social and economic context in which it occurs. It begins with an introduction to the status of women in Pakistan, and the prevalence and types of VAWG that affect them. It explores the various contexts that are affected by violence: economic, social and political, and discusses the action that has been taken to address violence to date. It goes on to identify some literature on the costs of violence to society and the economy, and to highlight the gaps in the literature, which this project aims to fill.

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03 April 2017

This report studies the prevalence of peer violence among sixth grade students in Hyderabad. It also seeks to describe associations between socio-economic status, school performance, mental health, gender attitudes, violence at home and peer violence perpetration and victimisation.

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08 November 2016

This presentation unveils a trial used to test the effectiveness of a multi-pronged intervention in reducing and preventing violence against women and girls/youth (VAWG) among families living in Lusaka, Zambia, and to test the effectiveness of the intervention in reducing identified risk factors of violence including, alcohol use, mental health problems and behaviour patterns.

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20 September 2016
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