Baseline Evaluation of a Peace Education and Prevention of Violence Program in Jawzjan province, Afghanistan

This report presents the findings of a baseline study conducted to evaluate a peace education and prevention of violence intervention implemented by Help the Afghan Children (HTAC) in Jawzjan province, Afghanistan. This intervention is being implemented and evaluated as part of the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls? Global Programme, funded by UK aid.

HTAC’s intervention aims to prevent violence perpetrated against children and between children by implementing peace education programming in schools and communities based on a comprehensive peace education curriculum and complemented by interventions aimed to reduce teacher use of corporal punishment, and work with families and communities to promote more equitable gender norms and reduce the use of violence against women and children.

The baseline study involved surveying 770 students (350 boys and 420 girls) in grades seven and eight, and 400 teachers (85 male teachers and 315 female teachers), in 11 schools in Jawzjan province where HTAC is implementing its peace education curriculum.

pdf Download (2.18 MB)

18 January 2018

Gibbs, A., Corboz, J., Shafiq, M., Marofi, F., Mecagni, A., Mann, C., ... & Jewkes, R. (2018). An individually randomized controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of the Women for Women International Programme in reducing intimate partner violence and strengthening livelihoods amongst women in Afghanistan: trial design, methods and baseline findings. BMC Public Health, 18(1), 164.

pdf Download (1.31 MB)

01 January 2018

Gibbs, A., Jewkes, R., Karim, F., Marofi, F., & Corboz, J. (2018). Understanding how Afghan women utilise a gender transformative and economic empowerment intervention: A qualitative study. Global Public Health, 1-11.

pdf Download (1.08 MB)

01 January 2018

This presentation, given by Professor Rachel Jewkes, Executive Scientist in the office of the President, South African Medical Research Council and Consortium Director, What Works Global Programme, examines different types of IPV, and assesses the relative importance of key driving factors, including poverty, food insecurity, social norms regarding both gender and the use of violence, and disability. The presentation outlines tasks to combat IPV and illustrates the beneficial effects of economic empowerment and gender empowerment, and of changing social norms.

  pdf Download (33.36 MB)

12 December 2017

Right to Play, Pakistan

Faiza, Manzil , Nazreen, Saima, Anmol Rani and Nimra from class 7th of girl’s government school in, Hyderabad are best friends. The six girls are Junior Leaders of their school-based programme, Right To Play. This programme and their friendship is built on the opportunities for interaction that emerged through the Right To Play activities in their school.

08 December 2017

Right to Play, Pakistan

A bright prospect for district Hyderabad’s under 17 girls cricket team, 14-year-old Hira, who goes to a girls’ secondary school in Pakistan, is an exceptional player despite her extremely poor background, and lacking basic resources.

Hira’s parents are illiterate; her father works as a mechanic in a workshop and so spending even the minimum on education was a luxury.

08 December 2017

One Community, One Family Programme, Nepal

My name is Parbati*, I am 24-years-old, married, and live in Kathekhola Rural Municipality in Baglung district. This is my story.

I have been married for four years and there are seven people in my family, I live with my in-laws, my husband and my two sons. Before marriage, I always worried about the kind of family I would be getting married into, but I was one of the lucky ones and my new family is very understanding and supportive.

07 December 2017

Zindagii Shoista: Living with Dignity, Tajikistan

Gulshan is an unmarried 21-year-old woman from Tajikistan, who aims to graduate from a University this year. She participated in the International Alert-led Zindagii Shoista - Living with Dignity’ project last year.

03 December 2017

Project Empower and HEARD, Stepping Stones, Creating Futures Project, South Africa.

In 2012 *Nompu was one of the growing number of young women living in an urban informal settlement in South Africa. Nompu had moved from rural KwaZulu-Natal to Durban, a port city on the east coast of Africa, in the hope of finding a job and establishing a better life for herself. Yet, without completing her high school education, she struggled to find work. In the midst of high levels of unemployment, limited state support, dense living conditions and a struggle for survival, Nompu was often beaten by her boyfriend. Nompu’s boyfriend himself felt alienated from everyday life, without proper work and struggling to make a life for himself.

02 December 2017

Globally, one in three women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence in their lifetime (WHO 2013). In Afghanistan, recent demographic and health survey data (CSO 2017) indicates that the prevalence of intimate partner violence (emotional, physical or sexual) perpetrated against women aged 15 to 49 is 56%, ranging from between 7% and 92% across different provinces. Based on the baseline for an impact evaluation of Women for Women International’s programme in Afghanistan, this brief describes the factors associated with physical and emotional intimate partner violence. The brief is intended for employees of governmental and non-governmental organisations, and donors, interested in working to prevent violence against women before it occurs.

pdf Download (1.47 MB)

21 November 2017
Page 2 of 4